A tell-all interview with our small business insurance expert

Mike Gaba is the Manager of Business Development for TruShield Insurance in Western Canada. His expertise is focused on insurance for startups, entrepreneurs and small businesses. Mike has always been… read more →

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Preventing slips, trips and falls at restaurants

In our previous blog article, we shared information on fire prevention tips for restaurant owners; now, we look at another common risk for restaurants: slips, trips and falls. Over the past decade, we’ve seen a rise in slip and fall claims against restaurant owners. As a result, there have been more lawsuits stemming from slip and fall accidents, with an increase in the amount of damages awarded for personal injury, lost employment income and expenses stemming from the incident. Slip and fall hazards can range from the obvious to the unexpected, but it’s your duty as a property owner or occupier to be aware of the hazards that may cause an accident. After all, the last thing on the mind of your patrons is to be mindful of hazards that you may have missed. A maintenance program that is proactive about identifying and preventing these hazards can help protect your patrons, staff and restaurant.

Tips to help prevent slip and fall hazards outside your restaurant The parking lot should be inspected at regular intervals for potholes, uneven surfaces, cracks and other debris. Areas of concern should be clearly marked and repaired as soon as possible. Debris that could cause slip

Fast Five – March 24, 2017

An undercover investigation into the sales practices of car dealerships around Calgary finds that consumers are being mislead, the U.S. government may be on the track of approving the Keystone XL pipeline that was previously blocked, a group of “fraud tourists” have been arrested after allegedly skimming credit card information from consumers, Saskatchewan’s new budget has tax implications for restaurants, and the commercial real estate marketing in Vancouver is heating up. Here are the top stories for the week:

An investigation by industry watchdog the Automobile Protection Association into the sales practices of car dealerships in Calgary found 17 out of 20 failed. Via CTV News Sources from the Associated Press feel that the U.S government is likely to approve the Keystone XL pipeline. Via CBC News A group with ties to organized crime has been arrested for fraud after allegedly installing credit card skimmers across businesses in Winnipeg. Via Winnipeg Free Press The Province of Saskatchewan’s new 6% sales tax for restaurants could take away an estimated $140 million in restaurant sales. Via CBC News The commercial real estate market in British Columbia’s Lower Mainland is seeing a big increase in demand, pushing values up by 47% in some

Tips for restaurants: fire prevention

In a previous blog article, we looked at common insurance claims we’ve seen from restaurant owners and provided some helpful risk prevention tips to avoid those claims. With fire being one of the top risks for every restaurant, we know that restaurant owners take measures to ensure their business is protected if a fire does occur. In this blog article, we provide more information on what an effective automatic extinguishing system looks like.

Special protection systems are used to extinguish fires that are fueled by easily ignitable, fast burning substances, such as cooking oils found in a kitchen.

Here are some requirements for a restaurant automatic extinguishing system:

Compliance The installation of restaurant automatic extinguishing systems (including wet extinguishing systems) must comply with the requirements of the ULC/ORD-C1254.6-1995 (Canada). Please see the Catalogue of ULC Standards, Special Publications and other recognized documents for more details on the testing requirements. Complete protection These systems should protect hoods, exhaust ducts, plenums, grease removal devices and all surface cooking equipment. Manual remote pull station All automatic extinguishing systems must have an accessible manual pull station. Automatic fuel/energy shut off All systems must be interlocked with fuel/energy supply to the cooking equipment, which must

Tips for restaurants: fire prevention

In a previous blog article, we looked at common insurance claims we’ve seen from restaurant owners and provided some helpful risk prevention tips to avoid those claims. With fire being one of the top risks for every restaurant, we know that restaurant owners take measures to ensure their business is protected if a fire does occur. In this blog article, we provide more information on what an effective automatic extinguishing system looks like.

Special protection systems are used to extinguish fires that are fueled by easily ignitable, fast burning substances, such as cooking oils found in a kitchen.

Here are some requirements for a restaurant automatic extinguishing system:

Compliance The installation of restaurant automatic extinguishing systems (including wet extinguishing systems) must comply with the requirements of the ULC/ORD-C1254.6-1995 (Canada). Please see the Catalogue of ULC Standards, Special Publications and other recognized documents for more details on the testing requirements. Complete protection These systems should protect hoods, exhaust ducts, plenums, grease removal devices and all surface cooking equipment. Manual remote pull station All automatic extinguishing systems must have an accessible manual pull station. Automatic fuel/energy shut off All systems must be interlocked with fuel/energy supply to the cooking equipment, which must

Tips to help lower your property insurance premium

If there’s one thing most small business owners can agree on, it’s that every penny counts—especially when you’re trying to get your business off the ground. Prioritizing spending is a… read more →

The post Tips to help lower your property insurance premium appeared first on TruShield Insurance.

Fast Five – March 17, 2017

The Ontario government has released new rules governing the use of recreational drones in the province, a huge snowstorm leaves hundreds of drivers stranded overnight in Quebec, a Canadian has been identified as one of the perpetrators in the Yahoo email hack of 2014, the increase in rural crime has some Alberta farmers responding with technology, and the city of Winnipeg has released its annual list of road conditions. Here are the top stories for the week:

Safety concerns have prompted the government to issue new rules about recreational drone use near airports and other buildings. Via CTV News Quebec authorities are investigating after approximately 300 drivers outside of Montreal were stuck for hours after trucks became stuck due to a large snowstorm. Via Montreal Gazette A Canadian cybercriminal has been accused of being one of the perpetrators of the Yahoo email hack of 2014 that compromised 500 million accounts. Via National Post Farmers and residents in rural Alberta are responding to an increase in rural crime by installing more video surveillance systems. Via CBC News The City of Winnipeg has released a list of the conditions of roads in the city, with most streets listed as good condition while

How are property insurance premiums determined?

Insurance is all about protecting your bottom line. The coverage you get is designed to help protect your business from unexpected costs that could jeopardize its future. One way to… read more →

The post How are property insurance premiums determined? appeared first on TruShield Insurance.

Fast Five – March 10, 2017

The OHRC has followed up with restaurant owners a year after making news about improper dress codes, Atlantic provinces are looking at legislation for pay equity, the government of Quebec has announced new funding for roads, the CMHC has released February’s new home construction data, and NAIT is working to change demographics in the skilled trades. Here are the top stories of the week:

The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) has found that restaurants are responding to their call to update dress codes for female employees by creating new policies. Via The Toronto Star Thanks to a private member’s motion, the Newfoundland and Labrador government has begun working on legislation that supports pay equity for women. Via CBC News The Quebec government is making a big investment into Montreal’s road system that will be completed over the next 2 years. Via CTV News New home construction data from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) shows an increase in February with southern Ontario showing the most growth. Via The Waterloo Record Women are still underrepresented in the skilled trades sector, but the North Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT) is working to attract more women to their programs. Via CBC

Fire prevention tips: spray paint booths

How safe is your spray paint booth?

The primary objective of a properly designed spray paint booth is to help prevent fire and explosion by containing the flammable vapours, removing them effectively and controlling ignition sources. Spray paint booths are not designed to protect your workers from overexposure to hazardous products – employees should always wear approved respiratory protection.

Containing flammable vapours

Containing flammable vapours limits the chance that those vapors will be ignited. To help contain vapours properly, consider the following guidelines:

The quantity of flammable and combustible liquids in the spray paint booth area should not exceed a one-day supply. The process area should not have more than three approved flammable liquid storage cabinets. Mixing flammable or combustible liquids should be done only in a mixing room or spray area. Removing flammable vapours

After containing flammable vapours, proper removal is essential to helping prevent fires. Proper removal is achieved by having an adequate ventilation system in the spray paint booth. The mechanical ventilation of the spray paint booth should be capable of removing vapors and mists to a safe location, as well as confining and controlling combustible residues, dusts and deposits. The ventilation system should be able to